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The Worm Lady - Bearded Dragon Diet

Annie 'The Worm Lady' bathing Mickey (a 5 month old beardie rescue)
Best buddies

Best buddies at 2 months of age: 'Bubba' top left, weighing 6 grams, and her brother  'Brownie' on right at 7 grams, catching a nap on Annie's neck 

 

Bathing your bearded dragon

Hi from Annie Brenner, 

  'The Worm Lady'

Here, in this video, I am showing you how to bathe a juvenile bearded dragon, handle it and socialize it, so that you'll eventually be able to have anyone handle him, and also be able to travel anywhere you want with your beardie, like I do with my bearded dragon 'Beastie'.

Baby beardies should bathe in warm water every day as it stimulates digestion and appetite and Juvenile dragons twice a week, or more, as it really helps their growth, shedding and socialization a lot, and also helps them absorb much needed moisture.

Bearded Dragon Care and Diet

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Feeding a Bearded Dragon - Carolina Classic Dragons

We daily feed our beardies the same quality 'organic greens' (kale and chard) that we also enjoy so much. 

our bearded dragon 'Bubba'

'Bubba' was rescued at 2 months' age (on the brink of death), survived and is here at 5 1/2 months old, and doing great, looking out the window. She loves organic greens, mealworm pupa (her favorite), silkworms, small horned worms, Phoenix Worms, waxworms, butterworms, and the odd cricket too! (she's getting bigger by the day) Feb,19,.2014 

7 Cool Facts About Bearded Dragons 

Bearded Dragons are one the the easiest pets on the planet to own and care for and are a wonderful pet for both beginners and advanced reptile hobbyists.  These beautiful lizards are great for families with young children also since they all seem to love attention.  They rarely get sick, rarely contract diseases harmful to humans (like 'Salmonella' very common with turtles and frogs), are super docile and love being handled.  All they really need is some heat, UVA/UVB light to activate their appetite and digestion and they'll live happily, for 12-14 years, on insects and some vegetables.  

Do get them outside in the sun as often as possible since they do need 'vitamin D' to stay healthy ... hatchlings should eat at least 3 times a day, since they do grow very fast and need lots of live feeders with some greens, to grow properly, gradually reducing their feeding to once a day by the time they reach a year of age. Mature bearded dragons will only eat two or three times a week, and only if and when they get hungry.  

This page provides guidance and information for your bearded dragon's care and proper diet for optimal health. 

Remember: a good variety of healthy live feeder insects and greens (live whole foods) = good health = no costly vet visits! )

 Choosing your bearded dragon

Beardies, in my humble opinion, are one of the best pets for beginners.  That being said though, they do live for 12-14 years in captivity so it is a long term commitment that needs to be seriously considered before going out and getting one just on impulse. When you decide to buy a Bearded Dragon, whether from a breeder or a Pet store, or even form a previous pet owner, or online ... physically look it over carefully.  Some of the things you should notice right away is how alert and active the Dragon is - you don't want a Beardie that can't lift it's head or looks lethargic; when you walk up to the vivarium enclosure the Bearded Dragon should be watching you with interest and should have bright and alert eyes.  Also check them out for sores, burns, external parasites or any deformities and make sure there is no pus or other build up in, or around, the eyes, nose or mouth areas.  Many Beardies will be missing toes or bits of their tail but that does not cause them any discomfort as long as the wound is healed and shows no signs of infection.  One of the most important things, in my opinion, is the size of the Beardie.  I would not recommend Beardies under 7-8 inches in 'nose-to-tail' total length.  Baby Beardies can be very fragile and more apt to illness and stress.  It is much easier to care for an older and more developed Bearded Dragon than a baby.

I got my first Beardie when he was 2 1/2 years old so he was already socialized, and came with the tank, stand, lights and timer, and a cricket keeper box too, and he was so easy to care for.  Even my husband Peter quickly became interested in my new pet.  They are so gentle and lovable ... and each has a personality all its own.  I fell in love with them!

So read the information on this page first - and when you fully understand the needs of bearded dragons, then you can decide if you are ready and capable of giving it the proper care it deserves to have a healthy and a happy life.

Bearded Dragon Diet Talk All Over Again 

The world over, people, animals and plants rely on feeding of some sort to sustain life. Energy and nutrients must travel from the outside of their bodies to the inside to produce the chemical reactions necessary to maintain life.  From poo-eating detritivores to the finest restaurant critics, everything eats!  Let’s have a look at how and what types of foods Bearded dragons need to eat to stay healthy.

Bearded Dragon Facts

Bearded Dragons originate from Australia. The most common bearded lizard species in the pet industry is the Inland Bearded Dragon, Pogona Vitticeps, which was formerly called Amphibolurus vitticeps.  

Natural Environment

This Bearded dragon lives in the deserts and woodlands of central Australia and spends much of its days in bushes and trees, and loves basking on rocks.  In extremely hot weather the Bearded Dragon will burrow underground.  The Bearded Dragon is diurnal and omnivorous so it forages for foods such as insects, larvae, small lizards and mammals, fruit, flowers, and other plant materials during the day time.  He has much variety in his diet, from a wide assortment of 40-50 different bugs or insects to eat.

Physical Characteristics

The Inland Bearded Dragon is tan to yellow in color and is called 'bearded' due to his ability to 'flare out' the skin of his throat when threatened or protecting his territory.  Its body has a flattened appearance which can become more pronounced if the dragon is alarmed.  The throat, head, and sides of the body are spined, but these are soft (almost rubbery) until he becomes alarmed, when they then become hard and almost prickly. The head is wedge-shaped and the tail almost as long as its body.  It's difficult to tell males from females in hatchlings and juveniles, until they become adult.  The femoral pores of adult males help to distinguish them from the females.  The males generally have larger and darker beards, and larger heads too.

Your Bearded Dragon is an omnivore meaning that he needs a balanced diet of meat protein (insects, bugs) and vegetable matter. A bearded dragon baby will eat mostly small insects. As he grows, he'll start eating more vegetable matter.  The juvenile Bearded Dragon diet (2-12 months of age) will consist of approximately 80% insects and 20% greens.  Young dragons should be fed 2-3 times daily; if or when they are not fed sufficiently they may eat the tails and toes of their cage mates.

The feeding and supplementation challenge in the rearing and keeping of Bearded dragons is actually finding a nutrition formula that provides the required daily 2 to 1 calcium to phosphorous ratio without the risk of a vitamin D-3 overdose.  If too little calcium supplementation is given the dragons develop Metabolic Bone Disease.  If too much calcium with vitamin D-3 is given then the dragons are at risk for toxicity, calcification of the kidneys and liver, and death

The Worm Lady  can help you in creating  A Balanced Diet  for your Bearded Dragons

Hi, it's Annie here again ... I bought this e-book years ago (when I got my first bearded dragon) and found it very helpful in getting my beardie, who was about 2 1/2 years old at that time, back to optimum health.  I know this package is a good value and I do recommend it for all beginners.  

Annie 'The Worm Lady' 

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What Do Bearded Dragons Eat  |  Bearded Dragon Food List  |  Feeding Bearded Dragons  |  Bearded Dragon Care  |  Bearded Dragon Facts

Bearded Dragon Diet Chart  |  What Can Bearded Dragons Eat  |  A Balanced Diet For Bearded Dragons

What Do Bearded Dragons Eat?

Bearded dragons are omnivorous, so they eat both plants and animals and need a lot of variety in their diet for optimum health.

In the wild, Bearded Dragons will eat 40 to 50 different varieties of bugs and plants, so as pet owners, it is really important to provide a good variety in our dragon's diet in order to get him healthy and keep him healthy, too!  Their natural diet typically consists of about 75%-80% bugs and 20%-25% vegetables and fruits.

That being said, your Bearded dragon can actually be maintained on a diet of 100% animal matter, but as responsible reptile owners we should try to mimic the bearded dragon diet in the wild as closely as possible, so, it is advisable to include 20%-25% fruits and vegetables in the overall food mix for your Beaded Dragon diet.

Keep in mind however that you do not want the fruit content to exceed 10% of your Bearded dragon's diet, because of the calcium-to-phosphorous ratio issue with dragons. 

The feeding and supplementation challenge in the rearing and keeping of Bearded dragons is actually finding a nutrition formula that provides the required daily 2 to 1 calcium to phosphorous ratio without the risk of a vitamin D-3 overdose.  If too little calcium supplementation is given the dragons develop Metabolic Bone Disease.  If too much calcium with vitamin D-3 is given then the dragons are at risk for toxicity, calcification of the kidneys and liver, and death.


The Worm Lady ® 

A Balanced Diet for Bearded Dragons

What Can Bearded Dragons Eat?

The vast majority of your Beardie's diet will consist of live feeder insects and larvae; they normally are not picky eaters and will eat just about anything you put in front of them, as long as you give them enough heat to digest their foods.  They naturally will not drink standing water but receive their moisture from dew and the moisture filled foods they eat.  So keeping them hydrated is very important.

Bearded Dragon Food List

Feeding Bearded Dragons Live Insects  (75%-80% of Diet) 


Here are the best ' insect-based' food items (listed in order of nutritional value) to feed your Bearded dragon

# 1 - ReptiWorms

ReptiWormsTM  (BSFLhave taken much of the guesswork out of the feeding and supplementation in the rearing and keeping of Bearded dragons by providing the almost perfect nutrition formula of a 2:1 ratio of Calcium-to-Phosphorous daily requirement without any risk of a vitamin D-3 overdose.  This is the only known live feeder insect that  naturally  provides very high Calcium with low Phosphorous levels (1.43-to-1 ratio), requires zero maintenance, is super easy to keep (3 to 4 weeks refrigerated at 51F-55F), and is the only calcium-rich feeder insect that can be safely fed as a staple.

Delicious, nutritious, high in calcium and low in fat. Perfect for a Bearded Dragon Diet!!!


'Genuine' ReptiWormsTM are the #1 Best Live Feeder for Bearded dragons and most Exotics, bar none.

Phoenix Worms in sealed tub
Nutritional Comparison
Silkworm

Silkworm 

Silkworms in Feed-Pod

Silkworms in Feed-Pod 

# 2Silkworms

You just can't beat the low-fat content & nutritional value of a silkworm.  Silkworms are high in Calcium, Protein, Iron, Magnesium. Sodium. and Vitamins B-1, B-2, and B-3. Because of their high Calcium content silkworms are especially great for gravid females since they help insure strong and healthy eggs and offspring, are soft-bodied so there is no worry of impaction in small and young lizards, provide excellent nutritional value, low fat content and ease of keeping too.

Silkworms are low in fat, high in protein, and have a good Calcium to Phosphorous ratio for beardies.

 Silkworms should be part of every Bearded dragon's live-feeder insects regular diet.

# 3 - Hornworms

Tobacco Hornworms have no chitin or exoskeleton so they pose no worry of impaction and their bright teal colour makes then very enticing.  They provide a healthy nutritional content of: 9% Protein, 3% Fat, 46mg/100g Calcium, and 85% Moisture.  They are very hardy and easy to keep (up to 3 weeks refrigerated at 50F-55F), are very low maintenance and provide a great feeder for your Bearded dragon's proper hydration.  It is unnatural for Bearded Dragons to drink from standing water so these super moist hornworms are great for hydration.

Beardies love these active, juicy and colourful fat worms.

Tobacco Hornworm

Hornworm 

Hornworms in Feed-Pod

Hornworms in Feed-Pod 

 # 4Butterworms

Similar in size and texture to waxworms these soft grub-like butterworms are the top insect feeder for Calcium with nearly twice as much calcium as any other feeder insect.  Butterworms can keep for up to 4 months when refrigerated at 50F.  Although high in fat content they can be fed as a regular treat to Bearded dragons, and are an excellent addition to the diets of juvenile dragons, those that are emaciated or suffering from poor body condition, as well as gravid females.

Butterworms are an absolute favorite of Bearded dragons.

# 5Waxworms

Waxworms pack a nutritional punch as they are high in Fiber, Protein and Fat, but they should only be fed to Bearded dragons as a treat since they are high in fat.  Waxworms never need to be fed and should be kept refrigerated (around 50F) in their substrate (usually wood shavings).  Bearded dragons on a heavy egg laying schedule will bounce back to peak health if treated to waxworms throughout the breeding season.

Superworms

Superworms 

# 6 - Superworms

Superworms are very active making them excellent for Bearded dragons that love to hunt and chase their prey. They have less chitin than mealworms making them much easier to digest (when feeding your small Bearded dragons try to feed the light-colored superworms since they're the ones that have just shed and have a less hard outer chitin).

 Superworm Nutritional Analysis

ProteinFatCalcium Phosphorus       Fiber
41.37% 41.00%420mg/kg  5630mg/kg       4.00%


Superworms, and virtually all other insect feeders, should be dusted with calcium immediately prior to presenting them to your pet, and they should only represent a portion of a Bearded dragon's daily or staple food source.

# 7 - Crickets

Crickets are a popular live food source for carnivorous pets such as Bearded dragons but are lower in nutritional value than larvae insects, such as Phoenix worms, silkworms, hornworms and waxworms, which contain more protein and digestible energy than crickets do.  Crickets consist of over 80% ash and must be given moisture, be gut-loaded every day, and be dusted with calcium just before feeding to your lizard. Crickets should represent just a small part of your Bearded Dragon's diet.  Unfortunately, many people feed their exotic pets very little else.  Remember that even the very best feeder insect, by itself, is insufficient in providing the proper range of moisture, vitamins, minerals, proteins, micro, and macro nutrients that ALL living things require.

Care should be taken when feeding any insect with an exoskeleton (crickets, mealworms, superworms, etc.) since this hard outer layer can cause your pet to become 'impacted'.  Try to make sure the crickets are no bigger than the space between your reptile's eyes -- this is a very wise rule of thumb.  

 Below is a list of the most common bugs that owners will feed their bearded dragons: 

  • Butter worms
  • Wax worms
  • Crickets
  • Earthworms
  • Hornworms
  • Mealworms
  • ReptiWorms
  • Roaches
  • Silkworms
  • Superworms

You should never feed your bearded dragon bugs that you have found in your house or property because those bugs could contain parasites and/or dangerous pesticides that may cause negative health effects on bearded dragons.



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NotePlant matter should make up approximately 20% (to 25% Maximum) of your dragon's diet and should consist mainly of green leafy vegetables (you may also include some other vegetables).  NEVER feed your Bearded dragon Iceberg lettuce since it has no nutritional value.  Fruit should make up the smallest portion of the diet (5-10% Max.). Shred or tear the vegetables and fruits into small pieces and mix them to encourage your dragon to eat all that is offered him, not just pick out his favorite foods. Following is a list of some popular plant-based foods for your Bearded dragon diet.

- - - - - -

Feeding your Bearded Dragons Fruits and Vegetables  (20%-25% of Diet max.) 

Chose your vegetables and fruits based on their high-nutritional value.


Here are the best ' fresh produce' foods  to feed your Bearded dragon

# 1 - Collard Greens 

Collards are good sources of vitamin C and soluble fiber, and contain multiple nutrients with potent anticancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and sulforaphane,  are also a high source of vitamin K (the clotting vitamin).  Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley have recently discovered that 3,3'-diindolylmethane in Brassica vegetables such as collard greens is a potent modulator of the innate immune response system with potent antiviral, antibacterial and anticancer activity.  

Tear  the leaves into small pieces and watch your Bearded dragon devour them. (Information from: Wikipedia.org)

# 2 - Dandelions 

Nutritionally packed with vitamins A, C, and K, as well as a good source of Calcium.  Feed the leaves and the flowers to your dragon but ONLY pick dandelions that you KNOW are pesticides-free for your Bearded Dragon's safety.  You can also find dandelion greens at your grocery store.

# 3 - Endive

A member of the daisy family, this plant is rich in Folate and vitamins A and K. 
Tear the leaves up first before feeding them to your Bearded dragon

# 4 - Carrots 

Are packed with minerals, antioxidants and beta carotine.  Do not chop them, finely grate them in order that your Bearded dragon may be able to fully digest them.  Many dragons eagerly eat carrots due to their sweetness, but limit this food item to once or twice a week.

# 5 - Bok Choy 

Also known as 'Chinese Cabbage', very high in vitamin A.
Tear into small pieces before feeding your Bearded dragon.

# 6 - Turnip Greens 

Very high in vitamins A, C, and K, as well as Folate and Lutein, and a good amount of Calcium.    
Feed the greens only, not the turnip root.

# 7 - Alfalfa Sprouts 

A member of the pea family, these are high in Protein, Calcium and other minerals, vitamins in the B group, vitamins C, D, E, and K.  These may be more difficult for your Bearded Dragon to swallow so chop them and mix a little bit of the alfalfa sprouts with other greens to help your dragon in swallowing them all together.

# 8 - Strawberries 

Excellent source of vitamin C and flavonoids, very low in saturated fats, a good source of folate and potassium, and a very good source of dietary fiber and manganese.  A bit expensive when out of season but Bearded dragons will feast on them.

# 9 - Figs 

Dried to the consistency of a prune, figs are sweet and nutritious as they provide dietary fiber, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, manganese and vitamin B6.   Cut them up well before feeding to your adult Bearded dragon -- juvenile dragons may have problems digesting the seeds so save this treat for adult dragons.

# 10 - Blueberries 

A good source of vitamin K and antioxidants.  Make sure you cut the blueberries in half in order to aid in your Bearded Dragon's digestion and nutrient absorption.

# 11 - Tomatoes 
Loaded with vitamin A and lycopene, tomatoes will help complement your dragons' diet and provide that additional variety which is essential to any Bearded Dragon's health and well being. NEVER FEED ANY OF THE GREEN PART of the tomato plant to your dragon OR TO ANY INSECT the dragon will eat since tomato plant leaves and stems are extremely toxic to Bearded Dragons. 

Below is a list of the most common staple vegetables that you can feed your bearded dragon every day: 
  • Acorn squash
  • Artichoke Heart
  • Asparagus (Raw)
  • Bell Peppers (Raw)
  • Bok choy
  • Butternut squash
  • Cabbage (Raw)
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Chicory
  • Collard greens
  • Cucumber (Peeled)
  • Lentils (Cooked)
  • Endive
  • Kale (only accasionally)
  • Kohlrabi
  • Mustard greens
  • Okra (Raw)
  • Parsnips
  • Pumpkins
  • Radicchio
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Turnip greens
  • Yams (Raw)
  • Zucchini (Raw)
  • Yellow squash

Also check out this link -- bearded dragon diet chart -- which also provides an excellent  list of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and plants that bearded dragons can safely eat and enjoy in a  balanced  Bearded Dragon Diet.  My thanks to "Beautiful Dragons Reptile Rescue" for a wonderful compilation.

 Bearded Dragon Care

Note: Always make sure you thoroughly wash all fruits and vegetables since most are sprayed with dangerous pesticides.  Also remember to limit fruits to no more than 10%, and vegetables to 15%, for a total of about 25% of your dragon's diet in order to achieve the optimal or ideal balance of 75% live feeders / 25% fruits and vegetables.  Yes, this will vary from day to day, but do try to keep track of your bearded dragon's diet on a week to week basis in order to provide the variety that will ensure optimal health, hydration, and avoid nutritional deficiencies.  

Finally, as with children (and lots of adults!! lol), it may be necessary to present the same item several times before your dragon will try it.  Keep trying! Toss a few wax worms or butter worms in with his greens - and always dust them lightly with calcium - if he seems to be getting picky.  While going for those worms, he'll also chow down on some of his greens!  See our 'Feeding Chart' to learn which insects are appropriate for your Bearded Dragon. (go here Feeding Chart )

Helpful Tip: I took a moment to speak with my local produce manager and he has agreed to let me take some leaves of the various greens he carries.  Every week, when buying my own veggies, I grab the odd dandelion, collard, endive and bok choy leaves that have fallen or been broken off.  I just toss them into the bag with my broccoli or Kale or whatever.  It costs me nothing, my Beastie gets a nice change from week to week, and my grocer has a few less leaves to clean up and throw out.  I'll bet your local grocery store will be just as helpful if you just ask.

 Additional info and helpful tips:

Meat food sources for your Bearded Dragon can include pinky mice (for adults) and insects such as:

  • Reptiworms
  • Silkworms
  • Horn Worms
  • Superworms
  • Butterworms
  • Crickets; pinhead crickets for juveniles
  • Mealworms
  • Wax worms - high in fat, so feed sparingly
  • King worms
  • Earthworms

Freshly molted insects (pale colour) are much easier for your Bearded Dragon to digest.  You should coat all live feeder insects with a calcium supplement (powdered calcium carbonate or calcium gluconate) 3 to 4 times a week for adults and every day for juveniles.  Live feeder insects should also be "gut-loaded," which means the insects are fed nutritious and vitamin-rich foods an hour before they are given to your dragon to eat.  Feed your feeder insects whole foods such as: ground legumes, corn meal, carrots, sweet potatoes, collard greens, mustard greens, broccoli, (not spinach or kale), apples, oranges, wheat bran, cereals (unsweetened), and rolled oats.  Several commercial products, formulated to be rich in calcium and vitamins, may also be used to gut-load feeder insects.  Quality Live Insects may be bought or wild-caught (if you are sure no pesticides are present).

Did You Know?
Fireflies are poisonous to Bearded Dragons, other reptiles, amphibians, and birds.
Feed your bearded dragon the insects by placing them in a small bowl.  After feeding, always check that none of the insects have escaped and fouled the water supply in the vivarium/cage.  You can also use a specially designed feeder rock, which allows insects to feed, but not to escape until you're ready to feed your bearded dragon.  In order to improve hygiene some owners prefer having a separate dedicated cage or place for feeding the meat-based portion of their dragon's diet.

Meat Food Sources

Always make sure the size of food you feed is proportional to your dragon's size (no bigger than the space between the eyes).  Under-nourishment, seizures, metabolic bone diease and intestinal blockages (impaction) can occur when hatchlings and juveniles are fed insects too large for them to capture or too hard to digest (crickets and mealworms have very hard chitin - the stuff your nails are made of - making them hard for small dragons to digest).

Plant Food Sources

Plant matter should only make up about 20% of your dragon's diet and should consist mainly of green leafy vegetables.  You may also include some other vegetables.  The fruits portion of your beardie's diet should make up the smallest portion of the diet (5-7% max.).  You should shred or tear the vegetables and the fruits into small pieces and mix them together to encourage your dragon to eat all that is offered, not just pick out his favorite foods, to avoid creating a 'picky' eater.  Below is our list of some popular plant-based bearded dragon foods.

GreensVegetablesFruits
  • escarole
  • kale (only occasionally)
  • collards
  • parsley
  • clover
  • dandelion greens (and flowers)
  • turnip greens
  • mustard greens
  • beet greens (only occasionally)
  • NEVER iceberg lettuce
  • broccoli
  • okra
  • peas
  • green beans
  • zucchini
  • squash
  • grated carrots
  • sweet potato
  • bell pepper
  • frozen mixed vegetables
  • figs
  • kiwi
  • papaya
  • melon
  • apples
  • grapes
  • dates
  • peaches
  • apricots
  • strawberries (seeds removed)
  • plums
  • bananas (peeled)


FOOD CHART KEY      
Feed daily (staple) Green   Remember to use your best judgment when choosing natural whole foods for your beardie.
Feed occasionally Black   I am using this colour-coded chart to help you in getting started.
Feed rarely Blue   I based it on how I feed my Beardies, vets I've spoken with, and lots of research too!
Questionable Brown            
NEVER Red   Ca:P  shows the Calcium to Phosphorous ratio (optimum ratio is  2.1 / 1.0  for dragons)
Best Food Items Ca:P Protein   Fat Fiber Sugar Water Notes
Cactus Pad/Leaf (raw) 2.3  /  1.0 0.80% 0.50%       Great staple veggie, high calcium
Cactus Pear (Prickly Pear) 2.3  /  1.0 0.70% 0.50% 3.60%   88% Great staple veggie, high calcium
Collard Greens 14.5  /  1.0 2.50% 0.40% 3.60%   91% Great staple, high calcium, moderate oxalates
Dandelion Greens 2.8  /  1.0 2.70% 0.70% 3.50% 2.40% 86% High calcium, high vit. A (140 IU/g), moderate oxalates, be cautious of pesticides in wild greens
Endive 1.9  /  1.0 1.30% 0.20% 3.10% 1.20% 94% Mod. oxalates, high calcium
Escarole             High calcium, mix with other greens
Mustard Greens 2.4  /  1.0 2.70% 0.20% 3.30% 0.80% 91% High vit. C (7%), high vit. A (53 IU/g), moderate oxalates (1287 ppm), goitrogens
Phoenix Worms1.52  /  1.0 17.30% 9.40%     65% Good source of calcium. www.Phoenixworm.com
Silkworms 1.0  /  2.4 63.80% unk unk   76% Contain enzyme called serrapeptase, with properties that make calcium absorption more efficient, can reduce inflammation and pain, and can break down arterial plaque.
Squash, Acorn 1.0  /  1.0 0.80% 0.10% 1.50% 2.20% 88%  
Squash, Butternut (Winter) 1.5  /  1.0 1.00% 0.10% 11.70% 2.20% 86% High fiber, high vit. A (78 IU/g)
Squash, Hubbard 1.0  /  1.5 2.00% 0.50% 8.70% 2.20% 88% High fiber, high vit. A (54 IU/g)
Squash, Scallop 1.0  /  2.0 1.20% 0.20% 3.80% 2.20% 94%  
Squash, Spaghetti 2.0  /  1.0 0.60% 0.60% 6.90% 2.20% 92% High calcium and fiber
Squash, Summer 1.0  /  1.8 1.20% 0.20% 1.90% 2.20% 94%  
Turnip Greens 4.5  /  1.0 1.50% 0.30% 3.20% 1% 91% High vit. C (6%), high vit. A (76 IU/g), mod. oxalates
Note: Ca:P  gives the Calcium to Phosphorous ratio (optimum ratio is  2.1 / 1.0  for dragons)
All Food Items Ca:P Protein   Fat Fiber Sugar Water Notes
Alfalfa             Great staple (alfalfa plant, not sprouts)
Alfalfa sprouts 1.0  /  2.2 4% 0.70% 2% 0.20% 93% Good source of vitamins A & K
Apple (peeled) 1.0  /  1.8 0.20% 0.30% 1.90% 11.50% 85%  
Apricot (fresh) 1.0  /  1.4 1.40% 0.40% 2.40% 9.30% 86% High vit.A (26 IU/g)
Artichoke Heart (raw) 1.0  /  2.0 3.20% 0.20% 5.40% 1.00% 85% Good source of Vitamins C & K.
Arugula (raw) 3.0  /  1.0 2.60% 0.70% 1.60%   92% High vit. A (24 IU/g), bitter flavor
Asparagus (raw) 1.0  /  2.7 2.30% 0.20% 2.10% 2% 92%  
Avocado 1.0  /  4.0 2.10% 17.30% 4.90% 1% 73% Unknown toxicity - deadly for birds
Banana 1.0  /  3.3 1.00% 0.50% 2.40% 18.40% 74% High phosphorus
Basil (fresh) 2.2  /  1.0 2.50% 0.60% 3.90%   90% High vit. A (39 IU/g)
Beans, Garbanzo(canned) 1.0  /  2.8 5.00% 1.10% 4.40% 3.80% 70% Low oxalates (24 ppm)
Beans, Green (canned) 1.4  /  1.0 1.20% 0.10% 1.90%   93% Moderate oxalates (312 ppm)
Beans, Green (raw) 1.0  /  1.0 1.80% 0.10% 3.40%   90% Moderate oxalates (312 ppm)
Beans, Kidney (canned) 1.0  /  3.9 5.20% 0.30% 3.50%   78% Moderate oxalates (312 ppm)
Beans, Lima (canned) 1.0  /  3.5 4.90% 0.20% 4.80% 8.50% 77%  
Beans, Pinto (canned) 1.0  /  2.1 4.90% 0.80% 4.60%   78%  
Beans, Soybeans(canned) 1.0  /  2.4 16.60% 9.00% 6.00%   63% Moderate oxalates (770 ppm), goitrogens
Beef (ground, low fat) 1.0  /  15.5 26.10% 11.70% 0%   61% High phosphorus and protein
Beet Greens (fresh) 3.0  /  1.0 1.80% 0.10% 3.70%   92% High oxalates, high vit. A (61 IU/g)
Beets (canned) 1.0  /  1.0 0.90% 0.10% 1.70% 6% 91% High oxalates (15,000 ppm)
Bell Pepper (green) 1.0  /  2.0 0.90% 0.20% 1.80%   92% Moderate oxalates (1171 ppm)
Bell Pepper (red) 1.0  /  2.0 0.90% 0.20% 2.00%   92% High vit. C (19%), high vit. A (57 IU/g), moderate oxalates (1171 ppm)
Bell Pepper (yellow) 1.0  /  2.2 1.00% 0.20% 0.90%   92%  
Blackberries (fresh) 1.5  /  1.0 0.70% 0.40% 5.30% 7.90% 86% Moderate oxalates, vit. C (2%), high in fiber
Blueberries (fresh) 1.0  /  1.6 0.70% 0.40% 2.70% 7.30% 85% Moderate oxalates
Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage) 2.8  /  1.0 1.50% 0.20% 1.00% 1% 95% High vit. C, high vit. A (30 IU/g), goitrogens
Borage (raw) 1.75  /  1.0 1.80% 0.70% 0% 0.90% 93% High in potassium.
Bran, Wheat (substrate) 1.0  /  73.0 15.60% 4.30% 42.80%   10% High phosphorus and fiber
Bread, White 1.0  /  1.0 8.20% 3.60% 2.30%   37% Great for hiding meds in
Bread, Whole Wheat 1.0  /  3.2 9.70% 4.20% 6.90%   38% Great treat and for hiding meds in
Broccoli (raw) 1.0  /  1.4 3.00% 0.40% 3.00%   91% High vit. C (9%), mod. oxalates, goitrogens
Butterworms 1.0  /  1.5 16.20% 5.20%     59%  
Cabbage, Green (raw) 2.0  /  1.0 1.40% 0.30% 2.30% 2.70% 92% High vit. C (3%), goitrogens
Cabbage, Red (raw) 1.2  /  1.0 1.40% 0.30% 2.00% 5.40% 92% High vit. C (6%), mod. oxalates (350 ppm)
Cactus Pad/Leaf (raw) 2.3  /  1.0 0.80% 0.50%       Great staple veggie, high calcium
Cactus Pear (Prickly Pear) 2.3  /  1.0 0.70% 0.50% 3.60%   88% Great staple veggie, high calcium
Cantaloupe (fresh) 1.0  /  1.5 0.90% 0.30% 0.80% 8% 90% High vit. A (32 IU/g)
Carrots (raw) 1.0  /  1.7 0.80% 0.50% 1.80% 6.60% 90% High vit. A (150 IU/g), moderate oxalates
Cauliflower (raw) 1.0  /  2.0 2.00% 0.20% 2.50% 2.20% 92% Goitrogens
Celery (stalk & leaves) 1.6  /  1.0 0.80% 0.10% 1.70% 1% 95% Finely chop
Chayote 1.0  /  1.0 0.80% 0.10% 1.70%   94% Moderate oxalates (340 ppm)
Cheerios 1.0  /  1.0 11.00% 6.00% 9.00%   3% High vit. D, A, and B vitamins
Cherries 1.0  /  1.6 1.10% 0.20% 2.10% 12.80% 82% Good source of potassium.
Chicken (cooked) 1.0  /  16.7 27.10% 4.10% 0%   68% High phosphorus, high protein (white meat)
Chicory 2.0  /  1.0 1.70% 0.30% 4.00% 0.90% 92% High calcium & fiber
Chives 1.6  /  1.0 3.30% 0.70% 2.50%   91% High vit. C, high oxalates, high vit.A (44 IU/g), potential toxicity
Cilantro (Coriander) 1.4  /  1.0 2.10% 0.50% 2.80%   92% High vit. A (40 IU/g), mod. oxalates (50 ppm)
Clover             Great treat
Collard Greens 14.5  /  1.0 2.50% 0.40% 3.60%   91% Great staple, high calcium, moderate oxalates
Corn, Yellow 1.0  /  13.0 2.60% 1.00% 2.00% 5.40% 77% High phosphorus, moderate oxalates (99 ppm)
Cranberries (fresh) 1.0  /  1.3 0.40% 0.20% 4.20%   87% High fiber
Cricket (before gut loading) 1.0  /  12.0 21.30% 6.00% 3.20%   70% Gut-load & dust to increase calcium
Cucumber (peeled) 1.0  /  1.5 0.60% 0.20% 0.70% 2.30% 97% Good source of water, poor nutritional value
Dahlia (flower) 1.4  /  1.0           Great treat
Dandelion Greens 2.8  /  1.0 2.70% 0.70% 3.50% 2.40% 86% High calcium, high vit. A (140 IU/g), moderate oxalates, be cautious of pesticides in wild greens
Earthworm   10.00% 2.00%     84% Do not buy worms raised for bait.
Egg (whole, hard boiled) 1.0  /  3.4 12.60% 10.60% 0%   75%  
Eggplant (raw) 1.0  /  3.0 1.00% 0.20% 2.50% 3.40% 92% Moderate oxalates (291 ppm), could be toxic to Beardies ???
Endive 1.9  /  1.0 1.30% 0.20% 3.10% 1.20% 94% Mod. oxalates, high calcium
Escarole             High calcium, mix with other greens
Figs (raw) 2.5  /  1.0 0.80% 0.30% 3.30% 6.90% 79% High in calcium & fiber. Moderate oxalates.
Garlic             Potential toxicity
Grape Leaves (not ivy) 4.0  /  1.0 5.60% 2.10% 11.00%   73% High in vit. A (270 IU/g), high calcium & fiber
Grapefruit (fresh) 1.2  /  1.0 0.60% 0.10% 0% 6.20% 91% High vit. C (4%)
Grapes (red & green) 1.4  /  1.0 0.60% 0.40% 1.00% 16% 81% Moderate oxalates (34 ppm)
Guava 1.0  /  1.3 0.80% 0.60% 5.40% 6% 86% High fiber & vit. C, mod. oxalates (140 ppm)
Hibiscus, Rosella (flower) 2.7  /  1.0 1.60% 0.10% 2.50%   86% Great treat and excellent source of vitamins
Hibiscus, Rosella (leaves) 2.3  /  1.0 3.30% 0.30% 1.60%   85%  
Honeydew (fresh) 1.0  /  1.7 0.50% 0.10% 0.60%   90%  
Hornworms 1.0  /  3.0 9% 3%     85%  
Kale (raw) 2.4  /  1.0 3.30% 0.70% 2.00% 2.20% 84% High vit. A (89 IU/g), mod. oxalates, goitrogens
Kiwi (fresh) 1.0  /  1.5 1.00% 0.40% 3.40% 9% 83% High oxalates, and high vit. C (10%)
Kohlrabi (raw) 1.0  /  2.0 1.70% 0.10% 3.60% 4.50% 91% High vit. C (6%), goitrogens
Leeks (raw) 1.7  /  1.0 1.50% 0.30% 1.80% 3.90% 83%  
Lemon Grass (Citronella) 1.0  /  1.5 1.80% 0.50% 25.30%   71% High fiber
Lettuce, Loose Leaf 1.4  /  1.0 1.30% 0.20% 1.00%   96% Poor nutritional value, may cause diarrhea
Lettuce, Iceburg 1.0  /  1.0 1.00% 0.20% 1.40% 1.80% 96% Poor nutritional value, may cause diarrhea
Lettuce, Red Leaf 1.0  /  1.2 1.30% 0.20% 0.90%   96% Poor nutritional value
Lettuce, Romaine 1.0  /  1.3 1.60% 0.20% 1.70% 2% 95% Poor nutritional value, high vit. A (26 IU/g), high oxalates
Mango (fresh) 1.0  /  1.0 0.50% 0.30% 1.80% 14.80% 82% High vit. A (39 IU/g), moderate oxalates (300 ppm)
Mealworm 1.0  /  25.0 20.30% 12.70% 1.70%   62% Low calcium, high phosphorus & fat, hard chitin shell
Mushroom, Portabella (raw) 1.0  /  16.3 2.50% 0.20% 1.50%   91% High phosphorus, WARNING - some mushrooms can be very toxic to Beardies.
Mustard Greens 2.4  /  1.0 2.70% 0.20% 3.30% 0.80% 91% High vit. C (7%), high vit. A (53 IU/g), moderate oxalates (1287 ppm), goitrogens
Nasturtiums (flowers)             Great treat
Nectarine 1.0  /  3.0 0.90% 0.50% 1.60% 8.50% 86%  
Okra (raw) 1.3  /  1.0 2.00% 0.10% 3.20% 2.40% 90% Moderate oxalates
Olives (canned, pitted) 29.0  /  1.0 0.80% 10.70% 3.20%   80% High in calcium and fat, high vit E (3%)
Onion 1.0  /  2.0           Potential toxicity
Orange, Mandarin 1.4  /  1.0 0.60% 0.20% 2.30%   88% Navel oranges have more vit. C and less vit. A
Orange, Navel 2.0  /  1.0 1.00% 0.10% 2.40% 8.90% 87% High vit. C (6%), moderate oxalates (87 ppm)
Papaya (fresh) 5.0  /  1.0 0.60% 0.10% 1.80% 5.90% 89% Great staple fruit, high calcium, high vit. C (6%)
Parsley 2.4  /  1.0 3.00% 0.80% 3.30% 1.10% 88% High oxalates (14:1 ox:ca), high vit. C (13%), high vit. A (51 IU/g)
Parsnip (raw) 1.0  /  2.0 1.20% 0.30% 4.90% 4.80% 80% Moderate oxalates (205 ppm), high fiber
Pea sprouts (raw) 1.0  /  4.6 8.80% 0.70%     62% High in vitamins A & K
Peach (fresh) 1.0  /  2.4 0.70% 0.10% 2.00% 8.70% 88% Low oxalates (10 ppm), goitrogens
Pear, Asian (fresh) 1.0  /  2.8 0.50% 0.20% 3.60%   88% High oxalates
Pear (fresh) 1.0  /  1.0 0.40% 0.40% 2.40% 10.50% 84% High oxalates
Peas, Green (raw) 1.0  /  4.3 5.40% 0.40% 5.10% 4.50% 79%  
Peas, Snap (pea & pod) 1.0  /  1.2 2.80% 0.20% 2.60%   89% Moderate oxalates (60 ppm)
Pepperment Leaves 3.3  /  1.0 3.80% 0.90% 8.00%   79% High vit. C, high vit. A (43 IU/g), high fiber
Phoenix Worms 1.52  /  1.0 17.30% 9.40%     65% Good source of calcium. www.Phoenixworm.com
Pineapple (canned) 2.0  /  1.0 0.40% 0.10% 0.80%   86% Moderate oxalates (58 ppm)
Pineapple (fresh) 1.0  /  1.0 0.40% 0.40% 1.20% 12% 87% Moderate oxalates (58 ppm)
Pinky Mouse 1.0  /  1.0           Very high in fat
Plum (fresh) 1.0  /  2.5 0.80% 0.60% 1.50% 7.50% 85%  
Pomegranate 1.0  /  2.7 1.00% 0.30% 0.60% 9% 81% Moderate oxalates (140 ppm)
Pork Chop (cooked) 1.0  /  7.8 30.20% 8.10% 0%   61% High in phosphorus.
Potato, Russet (cooked) 1.0  /  5.0 1.70% 0.10% 1.80% 1% 77% Mod. oxalates (150 ppm), high phosphorus
Potato, Sweet (cooked) 1.0  /  1.3 1.70% 0.30% 1.80% 5% 73% High vit. A (171 IU/g), mod. oxalates (1000 ppm)
Prunes (canned) 1.0  /  1.5 0.90% 0.20% 3.80%   71%  
Pumpkin (raw) 1.0  /  2.0 1.00% 0.10% 0.50% 4.40% 92% Moderate oxalates (400 ppm)
Radicchio 1.0  /  2.0 1.40% 0.30% 0.90%   93%  
Radish (raw) 1.0  /  1.0 0.60% 0.50% 1.60% 2.70% 95% Moderate oxalates (92 ppm)
Raisins (seedless) 1.0  /  2.0 3.20% 0.50% 4.00% 62% 15% Great treat, high fiber, high sugar content
Raspberries (fresh) 1.0  /  1.2 0.90% 0.60% 6.80%   87% Moderate oxalates
Rhubarb 6.0  /  1.0 0.90% 0.20% 1.80% 0.90% 94% Highly toxic! High oxalates (13,360 ppm)
Rice (brown, long grain) 1.0  /  8.3 2.60% 0.90% 1.80%   73% Must be cooked
Rosemary (fresh) 4.8  /  1.0 3.30% 5.90% 4.00%   68% High calcium and fiber.
Rutabaga (raw) 1.0  /  1.2 1.20% 0.20% 2.50% 5.60% 90% Goitrogens
Salmon, Pink (canned) 1.0  /  1.5 19.80% 6.10% 0%   70% High protein
Sardines (canned) 1.0  /  1.3 24.60% 11.50% 0%   60% High protein
Seaweed (Kelp) 4.0  /  1.0 1.70% 0.60% 1.30%   82% High calcium
Silkworms 1.0  /  2.4 63.80% unk unk   76% Contain enzyme called serrapeptase; this has properties that make calcium absorption more efficient, can reduce inflammation and pain, and best of all can break down arterial plaque.
Spaghetti (cooked) 1.0  /  7.0 4.80% 0.70% 1.70%   66%  
Spearmint 3.3  /  1.0 3.30% 0.70% 6.80%   86%  
Spinach 2.0  /  1.0 2.90% 0.40% 2.70% 0.40% 92% High in vit. A (67 IU/g), high in oxalates (19:1 ox:ca), goitrogens
Sprouts, Brussel 1.0  /  1.6 3.40% 0.30% 3.80% 2.20% 86% High vit. C (8%), goitrogens
Squash, Acorn 1.0  /  1.0 0.80% 0.10% 1.50% 2.20% 88%  
Squash, Butternut (Winter) 1.5  /  1.0 1.00% 0.10% 11.70% 2.20% 86% High fiber, high vit. A (78 IU/g)
Squash, Hubbard 1.0  /  1.5 2.00% 0.50% 8.70% 2.20% 88% High fiber, high vit. A (54 IU/g)
Squash, Scallop 1.0  /  2.0 1.20% 0.20% 3.80% 2.20% 94%  
Squash, Spaghetti 2.0  /  1.0 0.60% 0.60% 6.90% 2.20% 92% High calcium and fiber
Squash, Summer 1.0  /  1.8 1.20% 0.20% 1.90% 2.20% 94%  
Starfruit (Carambola) 1.0  /  4.0 0.50% 0.40% 2.70% 7.10% 91% High oxalates (95,800 ppm)
Strawberries (fresh) 1.0  /  1.4 0.60% 0.40% 2.30% 5.70% 92% High vit. C, moderate oxalates
Superworms 1.0  /  18.0 17.40% 17.90% 6.80%   60% High phosphorus, dust or inject to increase calcium
Swiss Chard 1.0  /  1.0 1.80% 0.20% 1.60% 1% 93% High vit. A (33 IU/g), high oxalates
Swiss Cheese 1.6  /  1.0 28.40% 27.50% 0%   37% High vit. D and A
Tofu (soft, raw) 3.6  /  1.0 8.10% 4.80% 0.30% 0.40% 85% High protein (hasn't been tested for beardies...?)
Tomato, Red (raw) 1.0  /  5.0 0.90% 0.30% 1.10% 3% 94% Moderate oxalates (263 ppm), acidic
Turnip (raw) 1.0  /  1.0 0.90% 0.10% 1.80% 3.80% 92% Moderate oxalates (4:1 ox:ca), goitrogens
Turnip Greens 4.5  /  1.0 1.50% 0.30% 3.20% 1% 91% High vit. C (6%), high vit. A (76 IU/g), mod. oxalates
Watercress 2.0  /  1.0 2.30% 0.10% 0.50% 0.40% 95% High vit. C (4%), high vit. A (47 IU/g), high oxalates (6:1 ox:ca)
Watermelon 1.0  /  1.0 0.60% 0.40% 0.50% 9% 92%  
Wax Worms 1.0  /  7.0 15.50% 22.20% 7.70%   62% High phosphorus, dust to increase calcium
Wheat Grass 1.0  /  1.0 25%         Very nutritious for reptiles and humans.
Yams (raw) 1.0  /  3.2 1.50% 0.20% 4.10% 0.50% 70%  
Yogurt (with active cultures) 1.3  /  1.0 4.40% 1.80% 0%   75% Although yogurt can increase the good gut flora, it is now believed that beardies cannot properly digest dairy products.
Yucca Root (Cassava) 1.0  /  1.7 1.40% 0.30% 1.80%   60%  
Zophobas Worms       unk 19.00% 17.00%   unk   58%  
Zucchini (raw) 1.0  /  4.4 2.70% 0.40% 1.10% 2.20% 93% High phosphorus
We trust this information will prove useful to you in the fine-tuning of your Bearded Dragon Diet.  If you have any questions or need any clarification, please let me know.  I'd be only too glad to help in any way that I can.
Annie ... The Worm Lady
theWormLady1@gmail.com


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